Call us to join the CSA now 623-363-7422

What is a CSA?

CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. A community of individuals that subscribe to receive weekly produce directly from a farm.

 

Community Supported Agriculture is a direct connection between a local farmer and the people who eat the food they produce. In return, CSA participants receive fresh, seasonal produce—sharing in the bountiful benefits of farm fresh goodness.

 

 

What produce will I get?

 

Produce selection varies season to season. Winter crops supply a variety of cooking and salad greens, root vegetables, broccoli, cauliflower, and citrus. As the year progresses, peas, tomatoes, corn, onion, cucumber, squash, melons, and many more fresh vegetables and fruits become available.

 

What is a share?

 

A share is an amount of an item - determined by the current harvest available.  For example, it may be a few red potatoes or a bunch of collard greens, a pumpkin, a bunch of herbs or a head of romaine lettuce.

 

Each week you would bring your own bag/box/cooler and pick up a share of vegetables and fruits (and sometimes beans or wheat berries or flowers). As a member, this is what you will pick up each week:

 

Mini Share - 4 items (each item may come in lb, bag, bunch, or basket of vegetable/fruits)

Classic Share - 8 items

Family Share - 2 classic shares

 

It may sound small but our produce is plentiful and a share is enough to feed a couple or a small family.

 

Want to start your own CSA pick up location? It’s easy!

 

We're always seeking CSA coordinators to manage additional CSA community groups. Coordinators would develop a new CSA group by generating and managing member subscriptions and coordinating produce distribution.

 

All you need is about 20 people who would like to begin their own pick up location, coordinate delivery schedule with Crooked Sky Farms, meet at location of your choice with your group for pick up.

 

CSA revenue is used to support the farm, and to pay the farmers, coordinators, truckers, marketers, and other employees that work to make the CSAs and markets a possibility.

 

More information about our CSA and CSAs in general:

 

CSAs provide an alternative model to industrialized agriculture. We’ve all purchased vegetables from the piles of flawless looking produce at the grocery store. But do we know where that food comes from? What country was that tasteless winter tomato grown in? Who grew that tomato? Does it contain genetically modified organisms? It is usually impossible to answer these questions, to trace our vegetables from farm to table. But CSAs can reconnect us with our food—providing a tangible, hopeful solution. CSAs promote fair wages for farm workers, environmental stewardship, economic sustainability, and strong communities.

 

History of CSAs

 

The roots reach back to Japan in the early 1970′s when a group of women, concerned about the increase in food imports and the corresponding decrease in the farming population and produce quality, initiated a direct growing and purchasing relationship between their group and local farms. The concept traveled to Europe and later to the US and was given the name Community Supported Agriculture at Indian Lane Farm, Massachusetts, in 1985. There are now over 1500 CSAs across the US and Canada. 

Community Support Agriculture Local Farming
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